Reflections on my 10.5 years public service in Liberia: the mistakes, challenges and opportunities

In the next few weeks and months, I will be reflecting on my ten and one-half years in the public service in Liberia. By no means was it easy and/or perfect but I think it is important to share my reflections on the challenges.

It has been nearly three (3) years and I think the temperature is about right that we begin to share our lived experiences so that those who care can learn something – anything – from it.

I will not endeavor to teach anyone for I believe that I am not qualify but at least I can share my experiences in terms of the mistakes we made so that others cannot make those same exact mistakes. If nothing else, I think understanding the mistakes we made might provide valuable insights into what others should not do. I may not know or have the right solutions but at least I can explain my mistakes so that others don’t have to repeat them.

Like many other progressive young people, I considered myself a radical advocate and a Neo progressive. And let me repeat, I am a “founding ideologue” of the grassroots progressive movement, the Congress for Democratic Change (CDC). Though in February 2006 I resigned my membership and position as Secretary General of CDC-USA, everyone believed that I never left the Movement because I kept my relationship with all the colleagues and friends.

Also, I was never a member of the Unity Party (UP) and in fact, folks in the UP called me “that CDC man”. Even though today the folks in the CDC call me “that UP guy”, I am not bothered by either for I am my own man: a Neo Progressive with deep thoughts, philosophies and principles. I apologize to no one for my political moves.

Be that as it may, I think the Liberian people deserve to understand the mistakes we made during the period they entrusted us with leadership and I want to do that. If not for anything else but that others may not make those same, exact mistakes. It will be painful and a betrayal if others repeat the mistakes we made simply because we didn’t tell our story.

stay tune….

Author: JAMES F. KOLLIE

I am a Liberian professional with passion for pro poor economic development and grassroot political organizing. I have read public policy, corporate finance and accounting at various levels. I have worked in government, private sector and non-profit sector.

4 thoughts on “Reflections on my 10.5 years public service in Liberia: the mistakes, challenges and opportunities”

    1. This is a great undertaken comrade, I am anxious to read the next episode. I am trialed by your initiative and look forward learning from your mistakes, challenges and opportunities in our body politics. My seat is fastened as I wait to hear from the great “Ideologue of the CDC”.

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  1. You are a true LEADER .

    Your decision to be yourself and not join the ruling Unity Party at the time (after leaving the CDC) speaks volumes about your STRONG character and belief. We were here (as we’re today) and witnessed fly-by-night, belly-driven politicians and carefree hedonists whose primary goal of joining/affiliating with the ruling party was to attain their selfish ends.

    Your final resolve to reflect, after some thoughtful considerations, and publicly share your life in public service, yet again, demonstrates the realist in you. It is only by knowing our past (through sharing of such life experiences and commentaries) that we can correct past mistakes, thereby improving our society. Many others will prefer to only highlight the gains while overlooking the mistakes.

    Thus, we eagerly look forward to learning from you senior comrade. Those who have eyes will see, ears will hear, minds to perceive and conscience to decipher.

    Thanks for this courageously BOLD action.

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  2. You have never ran short of thoughts that lights the way for others(emerging ones). Thanks for always giving people like us the chance to fetch from your experiences and lessons learned in public serivce.

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